Resources Library: Prevention

Charting the Path Forward from Campus Prevention Network

Added Thursday, September 28, 2017 by Action Alliance

In the six years since the release of the Dear Colleague Letter, and the four years since the passage of the VAWA amendments to the Clery Act, colleges and universities across the country have devoted unprecedented attention, time, and resources to preventing sexual assault on campus. EverFi’s Campus Prevention Network, in collaboration with It’s On Us, has examined the current state of sexual assault prevention to identify positive national trends in higher education and spotlight areas that schools need to continue to focus their attention. Among the findings, this report highlights:

  • Nearly 50% of college presidents have spoken publicly about sexual assault three or more times in the past year; only a quarter of college presidents did not speak about sexual assault publicly in the past year;
  • While fewer than a third of campuses (27.9%) reported stable, consistent funding for evaluation efforts of their prevention programming, nearly all campuses are engaging in at least one evaluation effort of their prevention programming despite funding challenges;
  • Peer educators are playing an increasingly prominent role in delivering sexual assault prevention programming on campus; schools and colleges need to ensure peer educators receive appropriate supervision and training to fulfill their responsibilities successfully;
  • Significant differences in funding and staffing levels for prevention exist across institutions, particularly in relation to school size; increased investment in prevention is necessary for ongoing impact and progress.

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Domestic Violence Fatality Review

Added Wednesday, November 16, 2011 by Office of Attorney General

The Commonwealth currently has seventeen local and regional domestic violence fatality review teams. Teams are multidisciplinary, and through stakeholder participation, they review homicides, suicides, and homicide-suicide cases related to domestic violence.  For more information on domestic violence fatality review in Virginia, please visit: http://www.vdh.state.va.us/medExam/dvfr/index.htm

Ending Rape Culture - Activity Zine

Added Wednesday, February 06, 2019 by Action Alliance

HOW DO WE ENVISION A BETTER WORLD?

This zine includes talking points and activities to help you facilitate that visioning conversation and support or shape your approach to violence prevention work.

The Rape Culture Pyramid and Ending Rape Culture Activity were created by the Virginia Sexual and Domestic Violence Action Alliance as a resource for community agencies, educators, and organizers to better understand and talk about rape culture.

Enhancing Services to Children and Youth in Virginia Exposed to Domestic Violence

Added Tuesday, May 22, 2012 by Action Alliance

A report on a 2-year (2006-2008) demonstration project funded by the Family Violence Prevention and Services Program.

Published by Virginia Sexual & Domestic VIolence Action Alliance, 2009.

56 pages.

Evaluation of Campus Based Gender Violence Prevention Programming from VAWnet

Added Thursday, September 28, 2017 by Action Alliance

Colleges and universities have been a key venue for the development and evaluation of sexual violence prevention programming. However, there are no studies demonstrating a link between campus-based sexual assault prevention programs and a subsequent campus-wide reduction in the incidence of sexual violence (Coker, Cook-Craig, Williams, Fisher, Clear, Garcia, & Hegge, 2011; Teten Tharp, DeGue, Lang, Valle, Massetti, Holt, & Matjasko, 2011).

Nevertheless, there remain important reasons to pursue campus-based gender violence prevention programming:

  • Prevention programming can create a safer climate where victims feel more comfortable reporting, actually raising the number of recorded incidences of assault.
  • Using a decrease in the incidence of sexual assault as the only measure of success for prevention programs ignores many other short- and intermediate-term goals that are conceptually linked to a reduction in sexual assault, such as increasing students knowledge about rape and changing attitudes related to rape so that students are less likely to blame victims (Anderson & Whiston, 2005; Lonsway, Banyard, Berkowitz, Gidycz, Katz, Koss, Schewe, & Ullman, 2009).
  • Research shows that a significant number of woman experience sexual violence while in college (Fisher, Cullen, & Turner, 2000; Koss, Gidycz, & Wisniewski, 1987; Krebs, Lindquist, Warner, Fisher, & Martin, 2007; Black et. al., 2011).

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