Resources Library: Healthcare System & Response

Access To and Use of Sexual Health Care Services Among Young Canadians With and Without a History of Sexual Coercion

Added Tuesday, May 31, 2016 by Action Alliance

The goal of this 2015 online survey was to determine access to and use of sexual health care services among adolescents and young adults with and without a history of sexual coercion, and to examine whether a history of sexual coercion was a barrier to using sexual health care services.

 

The study ultimately found that having a history of sexual coercion was not a barrier to the use of health care services among adolescents and young adults. In fact, rates of health care service use were higher among those with a history of sexual coercion than those without such a history.

Addressing Intimate Partner Violence, Reproductive and Sexual Coercion: A Guide for Obstetric, Gynecologic and Reproductive Health Care Settings Second Edition

Added Friday, September 30, 2016 by Action Alliance

This new resource, Addressing Intimate Partner Violence Reproductive and Sexual Coercion, cobranded by The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and 

Futures Without Violence, focuses on the crucial role of the health care provider in identifying and addressing IPV and reproductive coercion.

Beyond Trauma: A Presentation of Dr. Stephanie Covington’s Trauma Theory and Beyond Trauma Gro

Added Tuesday, November 12, 2013 by Virginia Department of Social Services

This Power Point presentation was presented by Qullin Drew Musgrave and Liz Cascone from the Action Alliance at the Virginia Department of Social Services Office of Family Violence Promising Practices conference on September 16, 2013. 

Circle of Hope: A Guide for Conducting Psychoeducational Support Groups

Added Monday, May 07, 2018 by Action Alliance

A particularly successful method for working with survivors of sexual assault and trauma is to bring survivors together in groups. Groups are an effective tool in giving hope and providing support, validation, connection, healing, and empathy. At the core of all sexual assault trauma is disempowerment and disconnection. To assist in recovery, empowerment and connection are key factors. It is amazing to witness the transformation that many survivors make because of these groups—because they realize they aren’t alone, because they realize that people care, because they learn that it wasn’t their fault, and because of the hope that comes through connection and validation. The relationships that members develop may be some of the most positive and supportive in their lives. Because these groups can have such a profound impact on survivors of sexual assault, it is vital that as advocates we possess the skills and knowledge to effectively facilitate groups. Hence, the purpose of this manual: to provide a roadmap of sorts, to navigate through the world of psychoeducational support groups.

From the Washington Coalition of Sexual Assault Program, this manual is considered a basic guide, written with beginner facilitators in mind. It offers practical guidance and recommendations for facilitation and design of psychoeducational support groups. The sources include existing research and literature about groups, the Office of Crime Victims Advocacy (OCVA) support group standards, and the experiences of those who participated in writing this manual. We encourage experienced group facilitators to add their own wisdom and experience to the information presented here as they conduct support groups.

Community Professionals’ Response to Intimate Partner Violence against Rural Older Women

Added Monday, March 28, 2016 by Action Alliance

The purpose of the study was to examine the awareness and experience of rural community professionals in Virginia dealing with intimate partner violence (IPV) in later life.  The reporting of IPV decreases as a survivor ages, but the problem does not go away.  Unfortunately, incidences of IPV in older adults are often lumped into the broader category of elder abuse.  This means that most community services are focused on alleviating abuse from adult children and caregivers. 

The current article found: (1) many rural community professionals likely to interact with older survivors were not aware of IPV issues when the survivor first presents; (2) social norms and cultural values played a large role in viewing IPV among older survivors; and (3) collaboration across agencies usually occurred because of legal mandates and healthcare emergencies for the older survivors.

Published: 2015 in the Journal of Elder Abuse and Neglect