Resources Library: Healthcare Professionals

Building Thriving Communities Toolkit

Added Wednesday, September 11, 2019 by Action Alliance

A toolkit to help unlock the power of individuals and communities to create a world in which all of us thrive.

The Building Thriving Communities: Civic Engagement Toolkit seeks to transform Virginia communities by increasing public participation in voting for candidates who align with their values and other means of civic engagement that promotes healthy futures. 

Download the entire toolkit all at once to find all of these resources (below) designed to support you in increasing community engagement with voting, the formation of public policy, and becoming active participants in democracy. Or you may download the handouts and guides separately.

The core component of the campaign is to build authentic connections between people, across differences, and around issues that make communities healthy, safe, just, and compassionate for all. 

This is a long-term campaign that draws upon the strength of the movements to end domestic and sexual violence: each person having a voice that is valued and respected, sharing stories as a tool for building understanding and mobilizing action, and empowering individuals and groups to bring about change in their own lives, in communities, and in the world.

The toolkit provides educational resources on civic engagement and strategies to engage communities and candidates.

Toolkit features:

  • * guide for facilitating community conversations around civic engagement;
  • * questions for candidates to build trauma-informed communities and systems;
  • * legislative advocacy guide;
  • * voting basics handout;
  • * print-ready posters to encourage voting for a #radicallyhopefulfuture;
  • * print-ready handout about why voting matters.   

Clinical Practice Guidelines for Working with People with Kink Interests

Added Monday, January 06, 2020 by Action Alliance

The lack of training and education about kink sexualities and the stigma attached to these interests have resulted in a lack of culturally competent treatment of this oppressed group. The gap calls for the clinical fields to address this unmet need as part of professional ethics and responsibility. Clinical practice guidelines assist healthcare practitioners by identifying high quality services and desirable professional practices. The Clinical Practice Guidelines for Working with People with Kink interests (hereafter referred to as “Kink Clinical Practice Guidelines”) are intended to outline the knowledge, skills, and attitudes important for providing culturally competent care to the population of people who are involved in kink, both kink-identified patients and those involved in kink who do not adopt that identity. Clinical practice guidelines are recommendations, not mandatory requirements. The Kink Clinical Practice Guidelines are not standards of care, nor should they be used to exclude any healthcare provider from practicing in a particular area. The Kink Clinical Practice Guidelines are proposed to improve the care, and minimize harm to the kink community, an underserved
and vulnerable population.

Developed by the Kink Clinical Practice Guidelines Project, December 2019

Community Professionals’ Response to Intimate Partner Violence against Rural Older Women

Added Monday, March 28, 2016 by Action Alliance

The purpose of the study was to examine the awareness and experience of rural community professionals in Virginia dealing with intimate partner violence (IPV) in later life.  The reporting of IPV decreases as a survivor ages, but the problem does not go away.  Unfortunately, incidences of IPV in older adults are often lumped into the broader category of elder abuse.  This means that most community services are focused on alleviating abuse from adult children and caregivers. 

The current article found: (1) many rural community professionals likely to interact with older survivors were not aware of IPV issues when the survivor first presents; (2) social norms and cultural values played a large role in viewing IPV among older survivors; and (3) collaboration across agencies usually occurred because of legal mandates and healthcare emergencies for the older survivors.

Published: 2015 in the Journal of Elder Abuse and Neglect

Creating Trauma-Informed Services Tipsheet Series

Added Wednesday, July 06, 2016 by Action Alliance

These tipsheets provide practical advice on creating trauma-informed services at domestic violence programs and working with survivors who are experiencing trauma symptoms and/or mental health conditions.

Recommended for domestic violence advocates:

A Trauma-Informed Approach to Domestic Violence Advocacy
Tips for Creating a Welcoming Environment
Tips for Enhancing Emotional Safety
Tips for Supporting Children and Youth Exposed to Domestic Violence: What You Might See and What You Can Do
Practical Tips for Increasing Access to Services
Tips for Discussing a Mental Health Referral with DV Survivors
Tips for Supporting Survivors with Reduced Energy
Tips for Making Connections with Survivors Experiencing Psychiatric Disabilities
A Trauma-Informed Approach to Employment Support: Tools for Practice

Culture, Language, and Access: Key Considerations for Serving Deaf Survivors of Domestic and Sexual Violence

Added Thursday, January 29, 2015 by Action Alliance

This policy and practice brief summarizes the findings from work with the Deaf community and offers practical suggestions for increasing Deaf survivors’ access to victim services and other supports, including those offered by the criminal justice and medical systems. This information providse a framework for meeting the needs of Deaf survivors that is grounded in the cultural and linguistic needs of this community. It will also ground policymakers, practitioners, and first responders in the victim services field in the realities of this often-overlooked community.