Resources Library: For Victims/Survivors

Federal Firearms Law: Domestic Violence Offender Gun Ban

Added Monday, November 15, 2010 by Office of the Executive Secretary


An important Notice to Persons Convicted of Misdemeanor Crimes of Domestic Violence This  brochure was developed by the Department of Criminal Justice Services and the Office of the Executive Secretary, Supreme Court of Virginia Supreme Court of Virginia, Office of Executive Secretary.

Forced Marriage is Abuse

Added Friday, August 19, 2016 by Action Alliance

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (Article 16) states that “marriage shall be entered into only with the free and full consent of the intending spouses.” As such, forced marriage is a clear violation of human rights.

The tactics used to force someone into marriage or to punish him or her for leaving a forced marriage are also human rights violations. The life of someone forced into marriage may consist of daily abuses, including rape, forced labor, domestic violence, and deprivation of the right to education, which can result in severe and long-term harm, including deteriorating medical and mental health.

The Tahirih Justice Institute's www.preventforcedmarriage.org website is an incredibly useful tool that serves as a resource library for service providers and includes over 10 recorded webinars on different topics related to providing services to forced marriage survivors and individuals at risk, as well as research papers, including the 2011 survey study on "Forced Marriage in Immigrant Communities in the United States", recommended books, and a news archive.

Also, check out the Forced Marriage 101 Webinar and the attached brochure and fact sheet to learn more about how forced marriage impacts individuals in the United States.

I-CAN!  Understanding Protective Orders in Richmond, Virginia

Added Thursday, July 14, 2016 by Action Alliance

The I-CAN! Understanding Protective Orders in Richmond, Virginia Booklet describes what a protective order is, the types of protective orders, the process of obtaining a protective order in Richmond, Virginia, tips about going to court, what to do after you receive a protective order, and various resources.

 

Attached is (1) the English version of the booklet, (2) a large print English version of the booklet, and (3) a Spanish version of the booklet.

Immigrant Families & Public Benefits: Under a New Presidential Administration

Added Tuesday, May 02, 2017 by Virginia Poverty Law Center

Recent changes to immigration enforcement have resulted in social services agencies across Virginia reporting decreased numbers of immigrant families requesting access to services. Some immigrant families even seek to withdraw their U.S.-born children from crucial benefits for which they are eligible due to fear of immigration enforcement. This PDF document is from a webinar given on March 31, 2017, to discuss changes in the immigration enforcement landscape, its impact on immigrant communities, immigrants' eligibility for public benefits for themselves and their U.S.-born children and strategies to encourage immigrant families to continue to access public benefits for which they are eligible. The webinar was sponsored by the Virginia League of Social Services Executives, Legal Aid Justice Center, Virginia Poverty Law Center and the Virginia State Bar Access to Justice Committee.

Legal Advocacy Manual 2013

Added Tuesday, July 30, 2013 by Virginia Poverty Law Center

The Legal Advocacy Manual provides victim advocates (as well as victims) with a comprehensive guide to help domestic and sexual violence victims in Virginia through some of the legal processes in which they may become involved. It provides both basic and intermediate levels of information about legal advocacy--what it is, the difference between civil and criminal justice systems, definitions of commonly used legal terms, and how to avoid the unauthorized practice of law, among other topics.  The manual offers context for the emotional, logistical, and legal hurdles involved in protective orders, criminal prosecutions, visa applications, and divorces. It is 76 pages long and is in PDF form.  Susheela Varky of Virginia Poverty Law Center updated it in June 2013 for recent changes in the law. Ms. Varky has used the manual as a resource for in-person trainings geared to victim advocates, and is available to tailor such trainings for your local Virginia domestic or sexual violence program.